Saturday, October 12, 2019

International Documentary Association (IDA) Shortlists

Winners announced December 7th! Visit https://www.documentary.org/awards2019 for more information.

Features Shortlist
Advocate (Israel, Canada, Switzerland. Directors and Producers: Rachel Leah Jones and Philippe Bellaiche. Producers: Paul Cadieux and Joelle Bertossa)

Amazing Grace (USA / NEON. Producers: Alan Elliot, Tirrell D. Whittley, Sabrina V. Owens, Joe Boyd, Rob Johnson, Chiemi Karasawa, Spike Lee, Angie Seegers and Joseph Woolf)

American Factory (USA / Netflix. Directors and Producers: Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert. Producers: Jeff Reichert and Julie Parker Benello)

Apollo 11 (USA / NEON and CNN Films. Director and Producer: Todd Douglas Miller. Producers: Thomas Petersen and Evan Strauss)

Aquarela (UK, Germany, Denmark / Sony Pictures Classics. Director: Victor Kossakovsky. Producers: Aimara Reques, Heino Deckert and Sigrid Dyekjær)

Black Mother (USA / Grasshopper Film. Director and Producer: Khalik Allah. Producer: Leah Giblin)

Cunningham (USA, Germany / Magnolia Pictures. Director and Producer: Alla Kovgan. Producers: Helge Albers, Ilann Girard, Elizabeth Delude-Dix, Kelly Gilpatrick and Derrick Tseng)

Dark Suns (Canada / Dogwoof. Director and Producer: Julien Elie)

Diego Maradona (UK / HBO. Director: Asif Kapadia. Producers: James Gay-Rees and Paul Martin)

EARTH (Austria / KimStim. Director and Producer: Nikolaus Geyrhalter. Producers: Michael Kitzberger, Markus Glaser and Wolfgang Widerhofer)

For Sama (UK, Syria / PBS Distribution, Channel 4, FRONTLINE. Director and Producer: Waad al-Kateab. Director: Edward Watts)

Hail Satan? (USA / Magnolia Pictures. Director: Penny Lane. Producer: Gabriel Sedgwick)

Honeyland (Macedonia / NEON. Director: Tamara Kotevska. Director and Producer: Ljubomir Stefanov. Producer: Atanas Georgiev)

Kabul, City in the Wind (Netherlands, Afghanistan, Germany. Director: Aboozar Amini. Producer: Jia Zhao)

Lemebel (Chile, Colombia / Compañía de Cine. Director and Producer: Joanna Reposi Garibaldi. Producer: Paula Sáenz-Laguna)

Midnight Family (Mexico, USA / 1091. Director and Producer: Luke Lorentzen. Producers: Kellen Quinn, Daniela Alatorre and Elena Fortes)

Midnight Traveler (USA, UK, Qatar / Oscilloscope Laboratories. Director: Hassan Fazili. Producers: Su Kim and Emelie Coleman Mahdavian)

One Child Nation (USA / Amazon Studios. Directors and Producers: Nanfu Wang and Jialing Zhang. Producers: Christoph Jörg, Julie Goldman, Christopher Clements and Carolyn Hepburn)

Our Time Machine (China / POV, Da Xiang. Directors and Producers: Yang Sun and S. Leo Chiang)

Present.Perfect. (USA, Hong Kong / Burn The Film. Director: Shengze Zhu. Producer: Zhengfan Yang)

Roll Red Roll (USA / POV. Director and Producer: Nancy Schwartzman. Producers: Steven Lake and Jessica Devaney)

Sea of Shadows (USA, Austria / National Geographic. Director: Richard Ladkani. Producers: Walter Kohler and Wolfgang Knopfler)

The Apollo (USA / HBO. Director and Producer: Roger Ross Williams. Producers: Lisa Cortés, Jeanne Elfant Festa and Cassidy Hartmann)

The Biggest Little Farm (USA / NEON, LD Entertainment. Director and Producer: John Chester. Producer: Sandra Keats)

The Cave (USA, Syria, Denmark / National Geographic. Director: Feras Fayyad. Producers: Kirstine Barfod and Sigrid Dyekjaer)

The Edge of Democracy (USA, Brazil / Netflix. Director and Producer: Petra Costa. Producers: Joanna Natasegara, Shane Boris and Tiago Pavan)

The Feeling of Being Watched (USA / POV. Director: Assia Boundaoui. Producer: Jessica Devaney)

The Hottest August (USA, Canada / Grasshopper Film. Director and Producer: Brett Story. Producer: Danielle Varga)

The Proposal (USA / Oscilloscope Laboratories. Director: Jill Magid. Producers: Charlotte Cook, Laura Coxson and Jarred Alterman)

This is Not a Movie (Germany, Canada / National Film Board of Canada. Director: Yung Chang. Producers: Anita Lee, Allyson Luchak, Nelofer Pazira and Ingmar Trost)

Shorts Shortlist
30 for 30 Shorts: Mack Wrestles (USA / ESPN. Directors and Producers: Taylor Hess and Erin Sanger. Producers: Erin Leyden and Gentry Kirby)
A Love Song for Latasha (USA. Director and Producer: Sophia Nahli Allison. Producers: Janice Duncan and Fam Udeorji)

After Maria (USA / Netflix. Director: Nadia Hallgren. Producer: Lauren Cioffi)

All Inclusive (Switzerland / Some Shorts. Director: Corina Schwingruber Ilić. Producer: Stella Händler)

America (USA / Aubin Pictures. Director: Garrett Bradley. Producers: Lauren Domino and Catherine Gund)

Black to Techno (USA / Frieze. Director: Jenn Nkiru)

Easter Snap (USA. Director and Producer: RaMell Ross. Producers: Joslyn Barnes and Su Kim)

In the Absence (USA, Korea / Field of Vision. Director: Yi Seung-Jun. Producer: Gary Byung-Seok Kam)

La Bala de Sandoval (Ecuador / Vtape. Director and Producer: Jean-Jacques Martinod)

Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (if you're a girl) (UK, USA, Afghanistan / Lifetime Films, A&E IndieFilms. Director: Carol Dysinger. Producer: Elena Andreicheva)

Lost and Found (USA, Myanmar / National Geographic. Director: Orlando von Einsiedel. Producers: Mark Bauch, Harri Grace and Dan Lin)

Marielle and Monica (Brazil, UK / The Guardian. Director: Fabio Erdos. Producer: Marina Costa)

Sam and the Plant Next Door (UK / The Guardian. Director and Producer: Omer Sami)

Scenes from a Dry City (USA / Field of Vision. Directors and Producers: Simon Wood and Francois Verster)

Show Me the Way (USA / Topic.com. Director and Producer: Kate Kunath)

St. Louis Superman (USA / MTV Documentary Films, Al Jazeera Witness and Meralta Films. Directors and Producers: Smriti Mundhra and Sami Khan. Producer: Poh Si Teng)

The Love Bugs (USA. Directors and Producers: Allison Otto and Maria Clinton)

The Nightcrawlers (USA, Philippines / National Geographic. Director: Alexander Mora. Producers: Joanna Natasegara, Doireann Maddock and Abigail Anketell-Jones)

The Separated (USA / The Atlantic. Director and Producer: Jeremy Raff)

The Unconditional (USA. Director and Producer: Dave Adams. Producers: Adam Soltis, Renee Woodruff Adams, Josie Swantek Heitz and Chris Tuss)

Valley of the Rulers (Serbia, Israel. Director: Efim Graboy. Producer: Dejan Petrovic)

Sunday, September 29, 2019

Celebrating a Decade of The Awards Psychic: Top 100 Films of 2009-2019, Part VI

Now that Emmy season is over, and we have a pause in the fall film festival rush, it is time to continue my celebration of my favorite films from the first decade of The Awards Psychic.

50. Snowpiercer (2013) - With Bong Joon-ho's latest release already having the Palme D'Or in its pocket, it is safe to say that 2019 is going to be a good year for the talented Korean director. But for fans of his, this is not a surprise. In the last decade he has churned out amazing films like Okja, Mother, and his best, Snowpiercer. Snowpiercer is a brutal, post-apocalyptic film that is a thoughtful and timely slow burn. Led by Joon-ho's amazing direction, Snowpiercer never lets up, even though there are plenty of audience members who wished they could get a breather from the intensity. It is also led by an incredible cast of Chris Evans, Jamie Bell, Octavia Spencer, Ed Harris, the late, great John Hurt, and a particularly brilliant performance from Tilda Swinton, who continues to surprise and amaze with each new film. Snowpiercer is the science-fiction genre at its best, and is a rare piece in a market flooded by big budget studio franchises. I personally cannot wait to see Parasite to see what this director has next for us.

49. Enough Said (2013) - Nicole Holofcener is a master of human stories, particularly ones with flawed human beings. But with Enough Said, she sanded down some of the edges (luckily not all of them), and created a vibrant, modern day romance for two characters of a certain age. Bringing her edge, wit, and emotion, Julia-Louis Dreyfus took a rare break from her hot television streak to be a well-cast dynamic lead. The late James Gandolfini, known mostly for his tough-guy groundbreaking work as Tony Soprano, also took a interesting career turn in what would turn out to be one of his final roles. While his untimely death is still a sore spot for his many fans (including this one), at least he got to have one last amazing change to charm his cast members and his audience. Enough Said breaks through the trappings of most romantic comedies with elevated performances (also including Toni Collette and Catherine Keener), a sharp, funny, honest, and quietly romantic script, and the eye of one of our best directors who has a knack for making us laugh, and when appropriate, cry. Enough said.

48. Top Five (2014) - Chris Rock had tried his hand at directing several times before he struck gold with Top Five. The basic story is Rock's character is being forced to broadcast his wedding to a television star on her trashy reality show. As he is being interviewed about his career and wedding, he meets a reporter (Rosario Dawson) who takes him on a day filled with twists and turns to get the story. It has a loose narrative, but its effervescent charm and amazing cast keep it held together, and keep the audience laughing along the way. Names like Gabrielle Union, J.B. Smoove, Anders Holm, Cedric the Entertainer, Ben Vereen, Tichina Arnold, Leslie Jones, Tracy Morgan, Jay Pharoah, Kevin Hart, and a ton of celebrity cameos pack the list of talent actors that carry this amazing ensemble piece. But the cast didn't do it alone. Rock deserves a lot of credit for his charming lead performance, his loose, yet effective direction, but mostly for his clever, funny, and relevant script. That leadership at the helm helped guide this instant comedy classic to incredible heights.

47. Mud (2012) - Professor Matthew McConaughey (you read that right, I also cannot believe it), will be teaching his first college class soon, and it is reported that one of the films that his students will study is Jeff Nichols' Mud. Some of his other films like Take Shelter and Loving got more awards attention, but my personal favorite has always been Mud. I think it is the perfect film to teach to a group of students who are interested in learning about film. It is the perfect combination of different genres. It is funny at parts, has an almost supernatural element to it, is action-packed, emotionally wrought, and has a wonderful coming of age story at its center. Plus it is an impeccably written, tautly and sympathetically directed film with an amazing ensemble that includes McConaughey, Tye Sheridan, the late great Sam Sheperd, Reese Witherspoon, Sarah Paulson, and Michael Shannon. Each of these performances, even the smallest, contributes so well to the film. Honestly, Mud is just one of those films that I just instantly connected to, like most of Nichols films. I did mention in an earlier edition of this list that I was a Jeff Nichols junkie. I truly mean it, and I am thrilled to see that the next generation of film lovers is going to learn about just how fantastic this film really is.

46. 50/50 (2011) - Comedies in this last decade have leaned heavy on either the indie quirky or the raunchy. Will Reiser's autobiographical look at his own battle with cancer managed to balance both of those pillars of 21st Century comedy, in an emotionally evocative, incredibly hilarious, and slightly dirty comedy. Led by Joseph Gordon-Levitt's performance, which was a true showcase for an actor that has shown so many different facets on screen, 50/50 is a great ensemble piece. The real surprise here was Seth Rogen. We all know that Rogen is funny, which he definitely was, but I did not realize just how good he could be when asked to show some emotion. He nailed the balance, as did the rest of the cast, which was rounded out by great supporting turns from Anna Kendrick and Angelica Huston. But it is Reiser's amazing script that gives the actors so much to do, and creates this funny and emotional story, and he truly pours his heart on screen and makes us feel as personally connected to his story as he is. I wish we had more comedies like this, and I wish Reiser would put another gem on screen soon.

45. Skyfall (2012) - James Bond films have been a part of our culture for almost half a century, and over the years, there have been so many incantations of this beloved character. In recent years, the franchise had a huge spark from the Sam Mendes directed Skyfall. It has so much more than your average Bond film. First and foremost was Roger Deakin's absolutely jaw-dropping cinematography. His shots gave us some of the best looks a Bond film has ever had. Second, was Javier Bardem. Bringing in that quality of actor gave some depth to a normally one-tone villain. I think that is the best way to describe why Skyfall stood out among so many films: depth. Depth in direction and production value, depth in the villain, depth in Bond himself. We got to see an emotional side to Bond with the death of a beloved character. We got to see his childhood home and learn about his past. It is that depth that elevated a character, a franchise, and a genre from entertaining, to fantastic.

44. Django Unchained (2012) - Quentin Tarantino has spend most of the last decade reinventing history so that the bad guys can get what was coming to them. Look no further than Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and Inglourious Basterds. Django Unchained is considered by many to be the lesser of the three, and it is, but that does not mean it is still not a fantastic, classic Tarantino film. It was ultraviolent, funny, wordy, impeccably acted by an amazing cast including Leonardo DiCaprio, Jamie Foxx, Kerry Washington, Samuel L. Jackson, and Christoph Waltz. It also had one of the most satisfying endings in recent memory. There is a lot of discussion about the legacy of slavery, the continuing battle of racism, and unfortunately it feels like something that is not going away anytime soon. Tarantino has a lot to say about this, and doesn't do anything subtly. The slave owners get gunned down and blown up, and Django and his love get to ride away in the sunset. If that isn't poetic justice, I don't what is.

43. The Kids are All Right (2010) - A quirky comedy led by a fantastic script, an amazing cast including Annette Bening, Julianne Moore, and Mark Ruffalo, Lisa Cholodenko's The Kids are All Right took the Oscar season by storm about a decade ago, and was a delightful film to see onscreen. But it was also so much bigger than that. Nine years ago, there was no nationwide legal gay marriage. Most of the depictions of LGBTQ+ individuals were men, and there was definitely not a lot of lesbian sex in film. Lisa Cholodenko and her team didn't care. They crafted a beautiful family dramedy about the hardships of marriage and raising kids, the mistakes we make, the fluidity of sexuality, and about how, no matter who we are, that at the end of the day, we all face the same issues, and have to learn how to rise above them for the people we love. That is why inclusion should not be a vice, because it transcends the niche and can be universal. The Kids are All Right proved that in spectacular fashion.

42. Blade Runner 2049 (2017) - I was so thrilled on Oscar nomination morning when the craft guilds of the Academy came through with several nominations for Blade Runner 2049. I was even more thrilled when it took home two Oscars, including having the distinction of being the film that finally gave Roger Deakins his well overdue Academy Award. But Blade Runner 2049 is more than just a technical masterpiece. It is also an incredibly human story at its heart, with great performances from Harrison Ford and Ryan Gosling, and is a think-piece science fiction that is impeccably put together by Denis Villeneuve, who is rapidly becoming one of our finest genre directors. Blade Runner was a classic that was underappreciated in its time. It is no surprise that its sequel suffered a similar fate. I think we will look back thirty years from now, and see a cult classic worthy of that status.

41. Steve Jobs (2015) - Steve Jobs is one of those films that for some reason got lost in the rush of Oscar season, and it should not have. There are so many things that are impeccable about this film. The brilliant aesthetic change throughout the film, using cameras from different eras to visually move the story through its three set pieces, was an awesome move that really did make the production design of the film come alive. The brilliant performances from Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslet are on point, and luckily did earn both actors Oscar nominations. Aaron Sorkin's wicked fast, character driven script kept the film moving at a nice pace, as did Danny Boyle's energetic direction. I know that Steve Jobs is cold character to watch, a lot like last year's Vice in that way. It is hard to root for a protagonist that is, well, an ass. But with such quality performances and production value, it is impossible not to get absorbed in this film.

Saturday, September 28, 2019

The Oscar Narrative: The Irishman Soars and Clint Eastwood Crashes the Party

Two big pieces of Oscar news dropped this week:

The first is not necessarily a surprise. I have been predicting that Martin Scorsese's The Irishman  to be a huge Oscar contenders since they announced it. But now we know! The film premiered at the New York Film Festival this week to rave reviews. It is being hailed as a masterpiece, and perfect culmination of Scorsese's incredible career. Yes it is long, but apparently, it doesn't feel that way. Oscar prognosticators are already claiming it will do well across the board, from the top categories (the three main guys, all Oscar winners, are apparently at the top of their game), down to the craft categories, including, yes, Visual Effects for the de-aging.

The other piece of news is that Clint Eastwood is trying to once again upend Oscar season at the last minute. His latest Richard Jewell, is set in the aftermath of the 1996 Olympic Park bombings, and tells the story of the security guard won became a suspect. It is written by Billy Ray, who gave us Captain Phillips, and it has a great cast including Sam Rockwell and Kathy Bates. Last year's The Mule ended up not being an Oscar contender, but previous films like Million Dollar Baby and American Sniper went on to snag lots of Oscar nominations, despite the late push, and Baby went all the way to Best Picture. We don't know yet how this one will land, but it is one to keep an eye on.

Sunday, September 22, 2019

71st Annual Primetime Emmy Awards

I will update the winners live:

Best Drama Series - Game of Thrones
Best Comedy Series - Fleabag
Best Actor in a Drama Series - Billy Porter "Pose"
Best Actress in a Drama Series - Jodi Comer "Killing Eve"
Best Actor in a Comedy Series - Bill Hader "Barry"
Best Actress in a Comedy Series - Phoebe Waller-Bridge "Fleabag"
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series - Peter Dinklage "Game of Thrones"
Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series - Julia Garner "Ozark"
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series - Tony Shalhoub "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel"
Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series - Alex Borstein "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel"
Best Directing in a Drama Series - Jason Bateman "Ozark - Reparations"
Best Writing in Drama Series - Jesse Armstrong "Succession - Nobody is Ever Missing"
Best Directing in a Comedy Series - Harry Bradbeer "Fleabag - Episode 2.1"
Best Writing in a Comedy Series - Phoebe Waller-Bridge "Fleabag - Episode 2.1"
Best Limited Series - Chernobyl
Best Television Movie - Bandersnatch: Black Mirror
Best Actor in a Limited Series/TV Movie - Jharrel Jerome "When They See Us"
Best Actress in a Limited Series/TV Movie - Michelle Williams "Fosse/Verdon"
Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series/TV Movie - Ben Whishaw "A Very English Scandal"
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series/TV Movie - Patricia Arquette "The Act"
Best Directing in a Limited Series/TV Movie - Johan Renck "Chernobyl"
Best Writing in a Limited Series - Craig Mazin "Chernobyl"
Best Competition Program - RuPaul's Drag Race
Best Variety Talk Series - Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
Best Variety Sketch Series - Saturday Night Live
Best Directing in a Variety Series - Don Roy King "Saturday Night Live - Host: Adam Sandler"
Best Writing in a Variety Series - Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

Saturday, September 21, 2019

2019 Emmy Predictions: Final List

I haven't made too many changes, but have tweaked a few categories. Check out my final list before tomorrow night's ceremony!:

Best Drama Series - Game of Thrones
Best Comedy Series - The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Best Actor in a Drama Series - Billy Porter "Pose"
Best Actress in a Drama Series - Sandra Oh "Killing Eve"
Best Actor in a Comedy Series - Bill Hader "Pose"
Best Actress in a Comedy Series - Julia Louis-Dreyfus "Veep"
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series - Peter Dinklage "Game of Thrones"
Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series - Julia Garner "Ozark"
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series - Tony Shalhoub "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel"
Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series - Olivia Colman "Fleabag"
Best Directing in a Drama Series - Succession - Celebration
Best Writing in a Drama Series - Game of Thrones - The Iron Throne
Best Directing in a Comedy Series - The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel - We're Going to the Catskills
Best Writing in a Comedy Series - Fleabag - Episode 2.1
Best Limited Series - When They See Us
Best Television Movie - Deadwood: The Movie
Best Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie - Jharrel Jerome "When They See Us"
Best Actress in a Limited Series or TV Movie - Michelle Williams "Fosse/Verdon"
Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie - Ben Whishaw "A Very English Scandal"
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or TV Movie - Patricia Clarkson "Sharp Objects"
Best Directing in a Limited Series or TV Movie - When They See Us
Best Writing in a Limited Series or TV Movie - Chernobyl
Best Competition Program - RuPaul's Drag Race
Best Variety Talk Series - Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
Best Variety Sketch Series - Saturday Night Live
Best Directing in Variety Series - Saturday Night Live
Best Writing in a Variety Series - Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

2019 Emmy Predictions: Best Drama and Comedy Series

Best Drama Series
Will Win - Game of Thrones
Could Win - Killing Eve, Better Call Saul, or Ozark
Should Win - Better Call Saul 
Commentary - Can anything beat Game of Thrones? The short answer: no. The long answer: hell no. Better Call Saul, Killing Eve, and Ozark all did very well with nominations, mostly because big competitors like Big Little Lies, The Crown, Stranger Things, The Handmaid's Tale, and Westworld all sat this Emmy season out. Next year, all of these categories are probably going to look a lot different, as these juggernauts all air seasons, and knock them out. They sat out this season because they knew nothing could beat Game of Thrones. I don't care about the complaints, the reviews, or the backlash. 34 nominations, already having won so many last week. This is one final chance for voters to reward this series, and they are not going to pass up the chance.

Best Comedy Series
Will Win - The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Could Win - Fleabag, Barry, or Veep
Should Win - Maisel or Fleabag
Commentary - I think Barry is a solid fourth place, but its incredible increase in nominations shows it has strength. Veep could easily win just out of love for the series, but I feel like its decreased nominations hurts it. Voters love it, but I think many of them have moved on. I feel like this is a race between Maisel and Fleabag, two truly deserving shows. While there is clearly not as much passion for Maisel as last year, it also increased nominations, did incredibly well at the Creative Arts, including winning the two Guest Acting awards, and even beat Game of Thrones in a craft category. That shows strength across the board. Fleabag's casting and editing win though show that it is really a threat, and in terms of passion, buzz, and critical acclaim, it has a lot going for it. Also, this is the last time for voters to reward it (especially since they ignored season 1). In a tight race, I am leaning Maisel, but I am expecting the unexpected.

Thursday, September 19, 2019

2019 Emmy Predictions: Best Actor in a Drama Series

Will Win - Billy Porter "Pose"

Could Win - Odenkirk, Bateman, Brown, or Harington

Should Win - Bob Odenkirk "Better Call Saul"

Commentary - This is such a wide open race this year, I could honestly see several possibilities. I am picking Billy Porter. Pose did get into Drama Series, he is one of the brightest stars of the moment, and season 2 aired during voting, which received rave reviews. But I could literally see four other guys winning instead. Bob Odenkirk has patiently waited to win this award, and this might finally be the year that he is able to finally win, and honestly, he deserves to get that recognition. Sterling K. Brown is always a threat, as he is a previous winner for this character, and is beloved among voters. Jason Bateman won the SAG for Ozark, and is a perennial nominee, who has never won an Emmy. This could be his chance. Finally, don't discount Kit Harington. Once again, it is easy to argue that his story line was not great this season. But with 34 nominations, voters love Game of Thrones, and that matters more than the quality of the final season.

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

2019 Emmy Predictions: Best Actress in a Drama Series

Will Win - Sandra Oh "Killing Eve"

Could Win - Laura Linney "Ozark" or Emilia Clarke "Game of Thrones"

Should Win - After all of her wins during the precursors, and how well Killing Eve did across the board this year, I am still predicting Sandra Oh. She deserves to win, I don't think Jodi Comer is too much internal competition, and honestly they owe her from Grey's Anatomy. So is she a lock? Hell no. Laura Linney has only ever lost one of her previous Emmy nominations, and she lost to the (at the time) up and coming star power that was Melissa McCarthy. Is Oh's star power as bright? This will be the test. Also watch out for Emilia Clarke. I don't care what critics thought. I don't care if her story line was disappointing. Game of Thrones got 34 nominations. They got almost every actor on the ballot into a nomination slot. She is a threat.

2019 Emmy Predictions: Best Actor in a Comedy Series

Will Win - Bill Hader "Barry"

Could Win - Ted Danson "The Good Place" or Michael Douglas "The Kominsky Method"

Should Win - Danson

Commentary - All of these tight races, and I feel like Hader has this one in a walk. Ted Danson is an Emmy-winning legend, and should not be discounted. Also, this year, The Good Place got into Comedy Series, which helps his case. If The Kominsky Method had made the Comedy Series cut, I might be more apt to put Michael Douglas higher. He is still an Oscar and Emmy winning legend, and will inspire votes. But this is Hader's to lose. He won last year and Barry did even better with voters this year than it did last year. I think he wins again.

Sunday, September 15, 2019

71st Annual Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards: Part II

I will update the winners live:

Best Guest Actor in a Drama Series - Bradley Whitford "The Handmaid's Tale"
Best Guest Actress in a Drama Series - Cherry Jones "The Handmaid's Tale"
Best Guest Actor in a Comedy Series - Luke Kirby "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel"
Best Guest Actress in a Comedy Series - Jane Lynch "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel"
Best Short Form Comedy or Drama Series - State of the Union
Best Actor in a Short Form Comedy or Drama Series - Chris O'Dowd "State of the Union"
Best Actress in a Short Form Comedy or Drama Series - Rosamund Pike "State of the Union"
Best Creative Achievement in Interactive Media Within a Scripted Program - Bandersnatch: Black Mirror
Best Original Interactive Program - NASA's InSight Mars Landing
Best Casting in a Drama Series - Game of Thrones
Best Casting in a Comedy Series -  Fleabag
Best Casting in a Limited Series/TV Movie - When They See Us
Best Children's Program - When You Wish Upon a Pickle: A Sesame Street Special
Best Cinematography for a Half Hour Single Camera Series - Russian Doll
Best Cinematography for a One Hour Single Camera Series - The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Best Cinematography for a Multi-Camera Series - The Ranch
Best Cinematography for a Limited Series/TV Movie - Chernobyl
Best Commercial - Dream Crazy - Nike
Best Period Costumes - The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Best Contemporary Costumes - Russian Doll
Best Fantasy/Sci-Fi Costumes - Game of Thrones
Best Single Camera Picture Editing for a Drama Series - Game of Thrones - The Long Night
Best Single Camera Picture Editing for a Comedy Series - Fleabag
Best Single Camera Picture Editing or a Limited Series/TV Movie - Chernobyl
Best Multi Camera Picture Editing for a Comedy Series - One Day at a Time
Best Hairstyling in a Single Camera Series - The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Best Hairstyling in a Limited Series/TV Movie - Fosse/Verdon
Best Makeup for a Single Camera Series (Non-Prosthetic) - Game of Thrones
Best Makeup for a Limited Series/TV Movie (Non-Prosthetic) - Fosse/Verdon
Best Prosthetic Makeup - Star Trek: Discovery
Best Main Title Design - Game of Thrones
Best Original Main Title Theme Music - Nicholas Britell "Succession"
Best Music Composition for a Limited Series/TV Movie - Chernobyl
Best Music Composition for a Series - Game of Thrones
Best Music Supervision - The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Best Production Design for a Narrative Program Half Hour - Russian Doll
Best Production Design for a Narrative Period/Fantasy (One Hour) - Chernobyl
Best Production Design for a Narrative Contemporary Program (One Hour) - The Handmaid's Tale
Best Sound Editing for One Hour Comedy or Drama Series - Game of Thrones
Best Sound Editing for a Half-Hour Drama or Comedy Series - Barry
Best Sound Editing for Limited Series/TV Movie - Chernobyl
Best Sound Mixing for a One Hour Comedy/Drama Series - Game of Thrones
Best Sound Mixing for a Half Hour Comedy/Drama Series - Barry
Best Sound Mixing for a Limited Series/TV Movie - Chernobyl
Best Stunt Coordination for a Comedy Series or Variety Program - GLOW
Best Stunt Coordination for a Drama Series/TV Movie/Limited Series - Game of Thrones
Best Special Visual Effects - Game of Thrones
Best Special Visual Effects in a Supporting Role - Chernobyl